41N 50W – the Titanic on stage in London

I’m looking forward to seeing a new play about the Titanic disaster, which is being showcased in London later this week.

Written by Robert Neal Marshall, the American actor and director, 41N 50W tells the story of the tragedy through the eyes of witnesses and survivors.

Their words are taken from the US Senate inquiry into the disaster, which opened in New York on Friday April 19, 1912, just four days after the sinking itself.

41N 50W is in the Studio at St James Theatre, 12 Palace St, London SW1, with performances on Thursday October 4 at 3pm and 8pm, and Friday October 5 at 6pm and 8.30pm.

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The French Connection – Cherbourg remembers the Titanic

I was lucky enough to get an advance preview this afternoon of the new Titanic exhibition in Cherbourg, France, which is due to open next month.

The Titanic called at Cherbourg for two hours on the evening of the day she sailed from Southampton – Wednesday April 10, 1912. Just under 300 passengers joined the ship here, including such famous names as John Jacob Astor IV, Benjamin Guggenheim, and “the unsinkable” Molly Brown.

One hundred years later, to the day, the Titanic exhibit will open in Cherbourg’s former Transatlantic terminal. It’s a new addition to the Cité de la Mer, an already huge facility that incorporates a decommissioned nuclear submarine, the Redoutable; an extensive history of underwater exploration; and several large aquariums.

Only a small proportion of the Titanic displays are currently in place, but it’s clearly going to be a must-see atraction. Without trying to rebuild the ship herself, the designers have set out to evoke several of her most important features. Each visit is intended to offer an “immersive experience” – albeit not in the same sense as the original voyage!

Visitors reach the new exhibit via parts of the Transatlantic terminal that have until recently only been accessible to cruise passengers. Strictly speaking, this glorious Art Deco structure post-dates the Titanic, but you only have to glance outside to see the spot where the great liner anchored, beyond the harbour walls.

You enter the exhibition proper to find yourself standing at a re-created segment of the ship’s rails, watching a huge screen that displays first a panorama of Cherbourg as seen from the Titanic, and then her next and final port of call, Queenstown in Ireland (now Cobh). From there, you can choose whether to move into the first-, second-, or third-class areas of the ship.

Sections that I was able to see today included a meticulous re-creation of the Titanic’s mailroom, and a mock-up of a first-class cabin. Those that have yet to be installed, but will be ready in time for the opening, include a “wireless room” where children can learn Morse code, and Captain Smith’s own quarters. The exhibition also broadens its scope to explore twentieth-century European emigration to the United States.

With many thanks to Laure Anne Forti de Marthe for her hospitality.

S.O.S. – The Titanic Centenary at the BFI

Here’s the full schedule for the Titanic season organised by the British Film Institute.

March 20 6.20pm NFT1, BFI Southbank

Titanic (TV miniseries, 2012)

A special preview screening of episode 1 of Julian Fellowes’ eagerly awaited four-part miniseries, plus a Q&A session featuring Fellowes, director Jon Jones, producers Nigel Stafford-Clark and Simon Vaughan, and cast members.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 5 onwards BFI Imax

James Cameron’s Titanic  (USA, 2012)

The new 3D version of James Cameron’s 1997 blockbuster.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 11 6.20pm NFT3, BFI Southbank

Hitchcock’s Titanic Project

A talk by Professor Charles Barr. Alfred Hitchcock was originally scheduled to make his Hollywood directorial debut with a Titanic movie in 1939. He called it a “marvellously dramatic subject for a motion picture”, but the film was never made. Professor Barr will show a sequence edited from his other work to illustrate how it might have looked.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 11 8.40pm NFT3, BFI Southbank, and April 15 4pm NFT2, BFI Southbank

Atlantic (UK, 1929)

The first talkie to tell the Titanic story – albeit, thanks to pressure from the White Star Line, under a different name – was based on Ernest Raymond’s play, The Berg.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 13–28 times vary NFT3 & Studio, BFI Southbank

April 16 8.20pm NFT2, BFI Southbank; special showing with introduction

A Night To Remember  (UK, 1958)

More of a docudrama than a conventional narrative, the affecting and beautifully made movie version of Walter Lord’s bestselling book stars Kenneth More as its stern-jawed hero, Second Officer Charles Lightoller.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 18 6.20pm NFT2, BFI Southbank, and April 25 8.30pm NFT2, BFI Southbank

In Nacht und Eis (Germany, 1912) and Titanic  (Germany, 1943)

By the time the dramatic silent In Nacht Und Eis was released in August 1912, footage of icebergs and the Titanic were so familiar that the trade papers were already saying “they don’t attract audiences any more”. As for the so-called “Nazi Titanic”, it’s a fascinating propaganda piece, commissioned by Josef Goebbels, which calls the disaster “an eternal condemnation of England’s quest for profit”.

*          *          *          *          *          *          *          *

April 24 8.40pm NFT2, BFI Southbank, and April 28 6.40pm NFT2, BFI Southbank

Titanic  (USA, 1953)

Romance and redemption against the backdrop of appalling maritime disaster. The young Robert Wagner falls for Audrey Dalton, and estranged couple Clifton Webb and Barbara Stanwyck face the prospect of separating forever – and that’s before the iceberg intervenes.

Titanic season at the BFI

The British Film Institute is marking the centenary of the Titanic disaster with a season of Titanic films. Showings at London’s BFI Southbank cinema in April will include Atlantic, made in England in 1929; the infamous “Nazi” Titanic, produced as anti-British propaganda in Germany in 1943, on orders from Joseph Goebbels, which will form a double bill with the 1912 silent melodrama In Nacht und Eis; the first Hollywood Titanic, released in 1953; and the 1958 British docudrama A Night to Remember. The new 3D version of James Cameron’s 1997 Titanic will be shown at the nearby BFI IMAX. I’ll be posting dates for each showing when they’re confirmed.

Potentially the most interesting event of all is Hitchcock’s Titanic Project, a talk by Professor Charles Barr on April 11. Alfred Hitchcock was originally scheduled to make his Hollywood directorial debut with a Titanic movie in 1939. He called it a “marvellously dramatic subject for a motion picture”, but the film was never made. Professor Barr will show a sequence edited from his other work to illustrate how it might have looked.

Return of the Little Girl Giant

I’m really excited to hear that the Little Girl Giant is going to star in Liverpool’s Titanic centenary events. The pulchritudinous puppet will perform a Titanic-related love story in the city’s streets, as part of the three-day Sea Odyssey extravaganza; her retro aesthetic makes her an ideal fit for the part.  I missed her when she came to London with the Sultan’s Elephant in 2006, but I’ve seen the elephant in action in Brittany, and it’s breathtaking beyond belief.

Here’s a clip of the Little Girl Giant in London:

They just builds ’er and shoves ’er in

The Titanic was launched in Belfast on May 31, 1911. The White Star Line didn’t believe in christening its ships with champagne; as a shipyard worker commented to a watching journalist, “They just builds ’er and shoves ’er in”.

Today’s the launch day for my book, The Rough Guide to the Titanic.

The book took a year to write. And now that I’ve built ’er, I’m shoving ’er in . . .

Today’s also launch day for Blogtanic. As the centenary of the disaster approaches, I’ll be using this blog to spotlight upcoming events; review the latest Titanic books, movies and TV programmes; and share stories from the final days of the great liner.

If you’re arranging an event, or commemorating the anniversary in some other way, contact me at info@gregward.info, follow @rgtitanic on Twitter, or simply leave a comment here.

In the meantime, to celebrate launch day, here’s the oldest surviving Titanic movie, In Nacht und Eis, a wonderful silent melodrama made within weeks of the disaster and long thought to have been lost.